Johnny Schaefer

Hollywoodtimes.net

By Valerie Milano

 

Johnny Schaefer: Hope is lifeLos Angeles, CA (The Hollywood Times) 8/30/16 – Los Angeles has suffered record heat this summer, but  singer-songwriter Johnny Schaefer has been in full holiday mode recording an album of Christmas songs. From Here to Nativity is Schaefer’s sophomore project. In October of 2013 he released Acoustic Remedy, an eclectic mix of songs with a wide range of themes and musical vibes. The new album gives fans more of his creative songwriting and smooth, agile vocals.

 

Johnny just finished up two nights singing backup for Josh Groban at the Greek Theater in Los Angeles and is working with some terrific musicians on the new project. “I am crowd-funding this album, which gives me an opportunity to work with people like Stephan Oberhoff, who is currently co-producing with Quincy Jones and served as Melissa Manchester’s Music Director for a decade, Christoph Bull, who heads the organ program at UCLA, Grammy-nominated harpist Carol Robbins, Chad Ellis from the band Poe, the Passenger, and drummer Sean Winchester (Everclear), to name a few” Schaefer beamed. “It has been an incredible experience!”

 

The new album will be a mix of traditional favorites like Bring a Torch, Jeanette, Isabella, the Bach-Gounod Ave Maria and O Holy Night as well as a number of brand new original Christmas tunes. “It’s true to my form of trying new things” Schaefer added. “The Ave Maria will be a very straight-forward rendition because, well, you  can’t improve on Bach, but the other covers will be a little different from the usual settings. For example, O Holy Night  will be a jazz waltz with harp, bass and drums. It’s often a bit dirgy for my taste. We’re lightening it up.”

 

First_Congo_Session_Christoph2 (1)The inspiration to do a Christmas album came from the success of Schaefer’s single last year titled All the Babes on Christmas Born. “We released it late, but still got a lot of airplay. Marianne Williamson saw the video on YouTube and immediately called asking me to sing it at her Christmas Eve service in Beverly Hills. She told me that I was ‘A walking Christmas’, which is kind of true. I absolutely love Christmas and Christmas music. So it makes perfect sense for me to make this album.”

 

“I think the album will surprise a lot of people”, he added. “It’s a journey from Advent to Epiphany. Along the way the individual Christmas stories facilitate a huge range of sounds and moods. The last song is a Latin jam about the Rosca de Reyes (Kings Cake) popular in the Latino community.”  Schaefer is married to a Mexican immigrant, Paco Silva, who creates most of his music videos. “LA is the perfect spot to make an album like this. We’re a melting pot of amazing cultures and viewpoints. It’s wonderful. I take a look at that through the lens of the holidays. It’s a really fun ride.

 

Johnny’s Fundly campaign ends soon. From Here to Eternity will be available everywhere in October. You can find out more about the project at http://www.hearjohnny.com

 

Connect with Johnny:

 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Johnny.Schaefer.Music/

 Twitter: @johnnysongs

 website: http://www.hearjohnny.com

 YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/prayingforequality

 Fundly: http://www.fundly.com/johnnys-christmas-songs

 

Hear Johnny on the Put it Together Podcast http://putittogetherpodcast.blogspot.com/2016/08/episode-139-christmas-wish-johnny.html

HollywoodTimes.net

Gratitude


Posted on December 3, 2015 by Valerie Milano

By Valerie Milano

Los Angeles, CA (The Hollywood Times) 12/3/15 – Johnny Schaefer is an eclectic Los Angeles-based singer-songwriter. He has an album, Acoustic Remedy featuring mostly original material. Award-winning author Elizabeth Massie wrote the lyric for this hauntingly beautiful song, set to music by singer-songwriter Johnny. it begins quietly with a solo guitar and instruments chime in gradually, then a choir, as it builds and soars to a stunning crescendo at the glorious end. For those longing to return to the true meaning of the holiday, this is a perfect anthem. Luscious arrangements and Schaefer’s rich baritone vocals communicate Massie’s universal message with clarity and warmth.  All the Babes on Christmas Born offers the sweet reverence, majesty, and hope of the Christmas season. Massie and Schaefer became friends through a Facebook community Schaefer formed called the Gratitude Club. They learned a lot about one another seeing five things each other was grateful for every day. They gained a mutual respect for one another’s talent and Massie presented Schaefer with the exquisite poem the song is crafted from. With Massie living in Vifginia and Schaefer residing in Los Angeles, the two have never met, but you would not know it from the perfect synthesis of their work on All the Babes on Christmas Born. Be sure to catch the uplifting video on YouTube and elsewhere. Be sure to check out the popular video!

 

https://youtu.be/ZB2hNDbHn8o

website: http://www.hearjohnny.com

Video:  https://youtu.be/ZB2hNDbHn8o

e-mail: jschaefermedia@gmail.com

Copyright 2015 Elizabeth Massie, ASCAP,  and Johnny Schaefer , ASCAP / Auditory Verve Music, ASCAP

No Depression: The Roots Music Authority

Don’t let the fading childhood photograph of singer/songwriter Johnny Schaefer’s Acoustic Remedy album trick you into thinking this is some kind of safe unplugged outing. No, there’s nothing on the record that even hints of sonic dissonance; however, Schaefer’s wild eclecticism easily makes it among the year’s most refreshingly original efforts, a fiercely independent vision that refuses to compromise for the purpose of easy commercial accessibility.

Given the emotional depth of his singing and the strength of his lyrical content, it becomes quickly obvious that Schaefer’s genre hopping isn’t a case of executing it for its own sake. He is simply an artist with a passion for various styles of music, and he will not allow any boundaries to limit his creative scope. The moving “April Fool” is a tale of how cultural clashes can tear into romantic relationships. The song’s hybrid of folk, Latin, and jazz echoes its theme of acceptance of ethnic differences.

Elsewhere, Schaefer explores his artistry with no regard to categorization. “Closer Than You Think” is throbbing synthesized pop while “Time to Cry” is soulfully performed Easy Listening. Just when the R&B pulse of “So Cold” seemed to stabilize Schaefer as a purveyor of adult pop, albeit on the adventurous side, arrives “Invocation,” a stunning combination of New Age atmospherics, chanting, and a spoken-word prayer from Marianne Williamson. Inventive and absolutely unique, Acoustic Remedy epitomizes how daring and fascinating music can be when the rulebook is tossed out.

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HollywoodToday.net

In a time when one iPod might shuffle tunes by Jason Mraz, David Bowie, Lady Gaga and Bach, Johnny Schaefer offers an intriguing mix of 17 eclectic tunes.Johnny Schaefer's Ablum Cover

  
By Valerie Milano

Hollywood, CA (Hollywood Today) 1/30/2014 – “I’ve been an April Fool, but if I promise to try, oh, could we be back together by Cinco de Mayo?” -Johnny Schaefer’s April Fool from his album Acoustic Remedy   
New music at www.johnnysongs.net

A friend once share an album with me that he really loved.  The concept was that one side showcased the singer’s naughty side while the other focused on her sweet, pure side.  The cover highlighted this by showing the artist in an angelic outfit on the front and a devil outfit on the back. I didn’t tell my friend, but I wouldn’t have known which side was which by listening.  They both sounded the same to me.  Obviously, for my friend, though, they were like night and day.  I think that disparity came from our varied reference points.  He mostly listened to a very easy-listening pop genre while I like a lot of variety.  We live in an eclectic city.  LA is home to people from all over the world and that makes for a fascinating cultural tapestry, if we choose to explore it. Some artists contribute by immersing themselves in a particular style and exemplifying it, while others choose to play with all that’s available to create something new.  In his album, Acoustic Remedy, Johnny Schaefer takes the latter approach, with fascinating results.

It’s not every day that you’ll pop a CD into a player and hear a reggae-flavored tune followed by a jazz ballad about culture clash, followed later by tunes featuring spiritual leader/congressional candidate Marianne Williamson and a techno gay marriage anthem.  That, and more, is what you get with Schaefer’s adventurous debut.  Schaefer’s smooth vocals and insightful lyrics span a huge range of emotion with skill.  Schaefer has a degree in music from California State University, Fullerton and has been the cantor at Blessed Sacrament Church in Hollywood for decades.  Consequently, you’ll hear a hauntingly beautiful piece titled Invocation which combines author and lecturer Marianne Williamson’s now famous opening prayer with an 800 year old Gregorian chant, The Golden Sequence, which is sung in many Christian churches at Pentecost.  Schaefer adeptly mixes in a tone poem of instruments from all over the world and the result has my Buddhist monk friend using it for her morning meditation.  The fact that this follows a celebratory dance remix of Schaefer’s response to Prop. 8, It’s About Love, can be jarring, but for some reason, it works.  Add in an ingenious mash up of the children’s classic Row Your Boatwith Moon River accompanied brilliantly and intimately by harpist Carol Robbins and you get an idea of the scope of the recording.  This is not your grandma’s Moon River, but, as Schaefer says in notes on his website, we’ve already heard it done that way by fabulous singers.  Schaefer offers a unique spin and it’s quite lovely. 

In an age when no one over 25 is even allowed to participate inAmerican Idol, Johnny Schaefer embraces the fact that he is now 52 with passionate energy.  He experiments with new sounds and also pays tribute to pop songstress Melissa Manchester in a beautiful mashup of her songs, Midnight Blue and Lights of Dawn.  He also explores breaking up with These are the Walls, Your Sweater andCloser than You Think, each with from a different angle both lyrically and musically.  He features some soulful trombone playing by Paul Nowell on the achingly beautiful So Cold

It was smart of Schaefer to put 17 songs on Acoustic Remedy.  With over 74 minutes of music, it is a journey that will lift you up and make you hit repeat.  The final anthem, Love Shines On, puts an exclamation point on his unabashed message that love conquers all.  It’s worth taking a chance on and is available on his website at www.hearjohnny.com, iTunes, Amazon, and radio sites like Spotify.  You can also hear a great interview where Schaefer discusses the creative process and much more on Daniel Garza’s Put it Togetherpodcast on iTunes radio.  

Delightfully Dark Art

Review of Johnny Schaefer’s CD – ACOUSTIC REMEDY

Posted: January 24, 2014 in Reviews
Tags: 

Music and lyrics on all songs by Johnny Schaefer, except:

Lights of Dawn
By Melissa Manchester
Midnight Blue
By Melissa Manchester and Carole Bayer Sager
Moon River
By Henry Mancini
Follow Your Road
By Bob Wilson

acoustic remedy cover

Acoustic Remedy is the title of this wonderful CD and quite aptly so, for it is indeed a most beautiful therapy of music and words, which is so desperately needed in all of our lives. Johnny’s words and music along with his amazing vocal range and intensity gives us a truly moving musical experience!

Where do I start with this delightful collection of melodies? Well, there are 17 brilliant songs, three featuring the amazing Marianne Williamson (A COURSE IN MIRACLES).

I have my favorites, “Little Bits of Heaven”, “April Fool”, “Time to Cry”, “It’s About Love – Celebration Mix”…Oh hell, I love them all! I will say that “Little Bits of Heaven” truly brings a smile to my face, “April Fool” is a gorgeous haunting melody reminding us that while there may be culture clashes at times, there is much to learn from others, while “Time to Cry” does indeed bring tears to my eyes and reminds me that it’s more than OK to cry, to let my feelings out. And then there’s the song, “It’s About Love – Celebration Mix”; a passionate blend of music and powerful words written after California’s Prop 8 passed in 2008, as a marriage equality anthem. After all, it really is about love; not politics, not religion, not about you or me. Love. Pure and simple.

So just who is this Johnny Schaefer? Well, he’s a Los Angeles based singer/songwriter of eclectic music, bringing his wonderful view of life, beliefs and music together in an awesome blend. He started writing songs when he was four years old. His Mom says he used to line up cans from the kitchen cupboard and pretend they were a choir or orchestra, “conducting” them with a wooden spoon. I also have it on good authority that he used jump ropes as microphones and would sing into them for hours. Oh, and the little toy guitar on the cover of this album was one of his favorite toys. Along with the cool camper (which I just adore!)

Johnny’s spirituality is as eclectic as his music; not only is he a cantor at a Los Angeles church, but he is a longtime student of A Course in Miracles, a set of books teaching a way of finding inner peace through meditation and prayer. Johnny has sung at lectures given by best-selling author Marianne Williamson, and guess what? He has incorporated some of her material into three songs on this album, one titled “Invocation”, an absolutely gorgeous Gregorian-type chant beautifully blended with Marianne’s voice culminating in a most uplifting and inspiring spiritual journey.

A truly eclectic culmination of songs about love, sadness, breaking up and heartache, spirituality and the joys of life. Acoustic Remedy is a truly beautiful collection that I highly recommend to anyone who enjoys the raw passion and soul of music. Play them, sing or hum along and I promise that you will have his words and music in your head and heart for a very long time.

http://www.hearjohnny.com/

http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/johnnyschaefer

NoDepression.com

Interview: Singer/Songwriter Johnny Schaefer on being eclectic, gay and Christian

Q: You wrote your first song at the age of four. How did you get into music being so young?

A: That's the reason I used the photo of my four-year-old self on the cover. I come from a musical family. My mother plays piano beautifully by ear and both she and my dad had magnificent singing voices. Dad played French Horn all through college and sang in the Capitol University Glee Glub and quartet. He was a Lutheran minister and music is a big part of the liturgy. My mom says she and dad both used to sing to me every day and night when I was an infant. She says the first anyone heard me do was sing before I talked, and that I used to pretend jump ropes were microphones and sing for hours. When I was two, I used to take the cans out of the cupboard and line them up like a choir and conduct them with a wooden spoon. Then I would use the pots and pans and their lids as drums. She said it was much cuter than it was annoying, but maybe she is being nice. She took me to choir practice at church and I was singing the whole liturgy by age four. I used to make up songs and begged her to write them down for me so I could see it. We don't have any of them anymore. Would be fun to see what I came up with.

Q: Your new album, Acoustic Remedy, is stylistically eclectic. How did the CD come about?

A: I love all kinds of music, and I have noticed that when I check out my friend's iPods, they do, too. You'll see standards, classical, jazz, and hip-hop all on one device. So I didn't worry about genre. Each song reveals itself, and I allowed that to happen. I think the continuity comes from the fact that I'm singing them all. It all still sounds like me. At one point in the process, a musician offered to "sneak up on my songs and give them a commercially appealing sound." I liked the sample that he gave me very much except that it was no longer me. It sounded like him. I told him it would be great for a remix, but I needed to stay true to my sound. I do realize it is unusual to have songs with prayers in them, jazz ballads, reggae, techno and a standard with a harp, but the songs come from a lifetime of living. Painters have a whole palate to choose from, why shouldn't musicians? Some of the songs are recent, but several were written decades ago. One song, "Time to Cry," has been recorded four different times over the years. Several times when I was younger, I connected with fledgling record companies that wanted me to be their first artist. None of them ever panned out. I also hooked up with an "entertainment lawyer" who took a lot of money and never did anything. So I kind of gave up. Then, in October 2012, I recorded "Invocation" and played it for Marianne Williamson. Her response encouraged me to do the album I always knew was in me. Recording it was the happiest year of my life, hands down.

Q: Were your parents supportive of your interest in music?

A: Absolutely! They paid for music lessons and I had my first solo in church when I was four. I was the Little Drummer Boy at Christmas a few years. They humored me when I wanted to entertain frequent guests who visited with a song or two. I was always a ham, always wanting to perform for people. Many times at night, we would stand around the piano and sing instead of watching TV. As a result, I have this album and my younger brother, James Martin Schaefer, sings with the L.A. Opera. He has an amazing voice!

Q: Where did you grow up and did your environment influence you creatively?

A: I was really fortunate to grow up in Porterville, CA, which is known for its outstanding school music programs. My high school, Monache High, had about 1,300 students when I went there and we had five choirs and marched more than 300 on the field for band. I played trumpet in both jazz and concert band. The choir and band director at my high school both attended our small church so I sang with them from the time I was small and they really encouraged me. My senior year I composed and arranged a four-minute piece for our entire band. I wrote out every single note, and it was pretty good. I got a standing ovation from the crowd of about 1,600 people in attendance and won outstanding senior bandsman. I also composed the score for our drama production of "Taming of the Shrew" using brass. I got my BA in music from Cal State Fullerton, where I majored in composition and voice.

Q: What artists inspired you the most and why?

A: The difficult part of growing up in Porterville was that it is the most conservative part of California, and I am gay. I was picked on in junior high under the perception that I was gay. Thankfully, it was cool to be in music in my school so it stopped in high school for the most part. But a singer who really got me through those dark times is Grammy-winner Melissa Manchester. Her songs are comforting and affirming. The intimate, soulful quality in her voice was a beacon of light to me. She was my companion and she got me through those lonely, terrifying days in the closet. Interestingly, I am not alone in that. Director Abe Sylvia grew up in Oklahoma around the same time and wrote and directed a film called Dirty Girl a couple of years ago which featured Melissa's music throughout. The film tells the story of two unlikely friends, one of whom is a gay kid who loves Melissa. I used to tell people that if I could do for someone what Melissa had done for me through music, my life would be a success. Other musicians who move me are Rickie Lee Jones (I think "Your Sweater" and "Row, Row/Moon River" are influenced by her), K.D. Lang, Rufus Wainright, Sting, Paul Simon, and musicals. I had to include a mash-up of two of my favorite Melissa Manchester tunes on my album, "Midnight Blue" and "Lights of Dawn," and I ended up as one of the winners in her cover contest. I now get to perform love with her in concert! How cool is that? Quite a stretch from sitting on the nosebleed section for her concerts at the Greek Theater and Universal Ampitheater back on the day.

Q: How did you get author Marianne Williamson to appear on your album?

A: I have been attending Marianne's lectures since the '80s, and she has profoundly molded my life for the better. I was one of the early volunteers for Project Angel Food when she founded it. I have also been the cantor at Blessed Sacrament Church in Hollywood since 1981. There is a chant I sing each year right before the Gospel reading at Pentecost, which is the feast of the Holy Spirit. The chant is called The Golden Sequence. It was written 800 years ago and is attributed to the Archbishop of Canterbury. As I was singing it, it struck me how similar it is to Marianne's opening prayer, which she has opened each lecture with for years. I wrote them both out and laid them side by side and was amazed at how well they mirrored one another. I decided to compose music to go underneath them. I started with a drone on an A played by a didgerrido. I arranged it so that Marianne and I were alternating a few lines of her prayer and a few lines of the chant. I work with a wonderful musician, George Reich, at a studio in his home in Glendale. We selected instruments like shofar and sitar and wove them in and out of the lines of spoken and sung word. I decided to finish it before approaching Marianne with it, since it was rather unique, and I didn't want to leave it to her imagination. When it was done, I contacted her and asked if I could meet with her. She invited me to her home, and it happened that I went there the morning after she appeared on Oprah's Super Soul Sunday. It was great to get an insider's perspective on that. I played the music for her and she said "Wow. You've already blessed the world just by creating it. Congratulations on your talent. I would love to hear more." With that, the spark was rekindled, and I decided to finally record the album I had always wanted to do. Talented film editor, musician and director Michale Canyon Drebert made a spectacular metaphysical video for "Invocation." I recorded two more songs utilizing Marianne. One, "Closer than You Think," incorporates a beautiful prayer on relationships that she said in a lecture in the '80s into a song that came from the prayer. That prayer taught me how to be in relationships. It is one of the most powerful prayers in my life, and I have had numerous people tell me they were moved to tears buy it. The other is "Wake Up!" which features material from her New Year's Eve 2012 lecture as well as soundbites from many different lectures. Given her recent announcement as a candidate for congress, it is a fitting summary of her message.

Q: You are quite open about being gay but also Christian as well. Was it difficult for you to understand how both can be united?

A: Yes, at first. I struggled all the way through college, suffering anxiety attacks and wishing, even praying, that God would let me die in a car accident because I was taught that suicide was unforgivable and was certain God was disgusted by me. My father found a love letter that I wrote to a young guy, but chickened out of delivering, when I was working at Disneyland in the Main Street Electrical Parade. He said "Do you want to talk about this?" I was embarrassed and really loved my dad, so I didn't want to disappoint him. He said, "Look, God loves you, I love you, it doesn't make any difference." That was a huge gift to me, because he died not long after that of lung cancer. I then went to a counselor who was also a Lutheran minister because that connection was very important to me. I asked him to help me stop being gay. He said "Why don't we not set an agenda, but just be open and see where it takes us?" Gradually I came to see my sexuality as a gift from God. I, and those around me, have learned so much about love we wouldn't have learned any other way. Marianne Williamson and A Course in Miracles were a huge help to me in that, as well. Dave, the counselor, paved the way for her. He had me read a lot of Jungian books, which are an excellent preparation for ACIM. ACIM is not a religion, but uses Christian terminology in non-traditional ways to train the mind to think thoughts of love instead of fear. It's a bit like the twelve-step program. One of the key lessons in the Course is "I am as God created me." My song "Little Bits of Heaven" is about the time I spent with Dave, learning that I was OK just the way I was.

Q: Did you encounter any resistance from your church about being homosexual?

A: The Lutheran Church that I grew up in now accepts gays and lesbians and even performs marriage ceremonies. They also allow gay clergy. Blessed Sacrament is rather unique as Catholic parishes go, in that it is run by Jesuits (the new Poe is Jesuit.) We have a gay and lesbian ministry and had an HIV support group for many years. I have always felt loved and welcomed at Blessed Sacrament. My friends and I joke that we get it from both sides. Many gay people say "How can you sing at a Catholic Church?" and many more conservative Christians say, "How can you be gay and sing in a church?" I have encountered some of that with my album. It has three songs featuring prayers and a gay-marriage anthem. But that is who I am. And I think it's really important for glbt folks to know there is a place for them in church. Blessed Sacrament's mission statement says "Many made one around the table of the Lord." They allowed me to announce sales of my album in church. They have been wonderful.

 

Amazon.com

 

5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect title for a perfect collection, January 24, 2014
By 
This review is from: Acoustic Remedy (MP3 Music)
Acoustic Remedy is the title of this wonderful CD and quite aptly so, for it is indeed a most beautiful therapy of music and words, which is so desperately needed in all of our lives. Johnny's words and music along with his amazing vocal range and intensity gives us a truly moving musical experience!

Where do I start with this delightful collection of melodies? Well, there are 17 brilliant songs, three featuring the amazing Marianne Williamson (A COURSE IN MIRACLES).

I have my favorites, "Little Bits of Heaven", "April Fool", "Time to Cry", "It's About Love - Celebration Mix"...Oh hell, I love them all! I will say that "Little Bits of Heaven" truly brings a smile to my face, "April Fool" is a gorgeous haunting melody reminding us that while there may be culture clashes at times, there is much to learn from others, while "Time to Cry" does indeed bring tears to my eyes and reminds me that it's more than OK to cry, to let my feelings out. And then there's the song, "It's About Love - Celebration Mix"; a passionate blend of music and powerful words written after California's Prop 8 passed in 2008, as a marriage equality anthem. After all, it really is about love; not politics, not religion, not about you or me. Love. Pure and simple.

So just who is this Johnny Schaefer? Well, he's a Los Angeles based singer/songwriter of eclectic music, bringing his wonderful view of life, beliefs and music together in an awesome blend. He started writing songs when he was four years old. His Mom says he used to line up cans from the kitchen cupboard and pretend they were a choir or orchestra, "conducting" them with a wooden spoon. I also have it on good authority that he used jump ropes as microphones and would sing into them for hours. Oh, and the little toy guitar on the cover of this album was one of his favorite toys. Along with the cool camper (which I just adore!)

Johnny's spirituality is as eclectic as his music; not only is he a cantor at a Los Angeles church, but he is a longtime student of A Course in Miracles, a set of books teaching a way of finding inner peace through meditation and prayer. Johnny has sung at lectures given by best-selling author Marianne Williamson, and guess what? He has incorporated some of her material into three songs on this album, one titled "Invocation", an absolutely gorgeous Gregorian-type chant beautifully blended with Marianne's voice culminating in a most uplifting and inspiring spiritual journey.

A truly eclectic culmination of songs about love, sadness, breaking up and heartache, spirituality and the joys of life. Acoustic Remedy is a truly beautiful collection that I highly recommend to anyone who enjoys the raw passion and soul of music. Play them, sing or hum along and I promise that you will have his words and music in your head and heart for a very long time.

Amazon.com

 

5.0 out of 5 stars Music good for the soul., November 5, 2013
By 
Amazon Customer (California) -
This review is from: Acoustic Remedy (Audio CD)
Listened to it on the way to see my cancer doctor today. It was uplifting and honest music. Very eclectic range something for everyone. I'm having trouble deciding on favorites, little bits of heaven, row row row/moon river, it's about love, were instant hits for me.

Hollywoodtimes.net

By Valerie Milano

 

Los Angeles, CA (The Hollywood Times) 12/3/15 – Johnny Schaefer is an eclectic Los Angeles-based singer-songwriter. He has an album, Acoustic ReCover of single distribution of All the Babes on Christmas Bornmedy featuring mostly original material. Award-winning author Elizabeth Massie wrote the lyric for this hauntingly beautiful song, set to music by singer-songwriter Johnny. it begins quietly with a solo guitar and instruments chime in gradually, then a choir, as it builds and soars to a stunning crescendo at the glorious end. For those longing to return to the true meaning of the holiday, this is a perfect anthem. Luscious arrangements and Schaefer’s rich baritone vocals communicate Massie’s universal message with clarity and warmth.  All the Babes on Christmas Born offers the sweet reverence, majesty, and hope of the Christmas season. Massie and Schaefer became friends through a Facebook community Schaefer formed called the Gratitude Club. They learned a lot about one another seeing five things each other was grateful for every day. They gained a mutual respect for one another’s talent and Massie presented Schaefer with the exquisite poem the song is crafted from. With Massie living in Vifginia and Schaefer residing in Los Angeles, the two have never met, but you would not know it from the perfect synthesis of their work on All the Babes on Christmas Born. Be sure to catch the uplifting video on YouTube and elsewhere. Be sure to check out the popular video!

 

sch2https://youtu.be/ZB2hNDbHn8o

 

website: http://www.hearjohnny.com

 

Video:  https://youtu.be/ZB2hNDbHn8o

 

e-mail: jschaefermedia

 

Copyright 2015 Elizabeth Massie, ASCAP,  and Johnny Schaefer , ASCAP / Auditory Verve Music, ASCAP

CU Today

LOS ANGELES–An employee of Pasadena FCU here has released a Christmas album. Johnny Schaefer, the credit union’s marketing and business development director, has combined his love for all things Christmas with his musical skills to create From Here to Nativity, a collection of seven original and seven classic Christmas songs. Schaefer crowd-funded the project raised nearly $5,000, 10% of which he donated to the Blessed Sacrament Church Choir in Hollywood, where he has been a cantor and soloist since 1981. Schaefer has a degree in Music Composition and Voice from California State University, Fullerton and has sung backup for Josh Groban, Melissa Manchester, Diahann Carroll and Sarah Vaughan. “The album takes the listener from the season of Advent through Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and finally to Epiphany,” according to a release about the new album. Schaefer recorded part of the album on the John Williams soundstage at the USC School of Cinematic Arts, while other tracks were recorded in a basement. He worked with a Grammy-nominated harpist on a Jazz waltz version of O Holy Night and the Bach-Gounod Ave Maria (also with cello). He also recorded a fifties rock and roll-style song he wrote about a boy who thinks he got stiffed by Santa called Oh Golly, Lookie, featuring former Everclear drummer Sean Winchester and a trio of doo-wop girls a la Little Shop of Horrors, according to the release. "The project was probably the most joy-filled endeavor of my life,” he said. "I recorded an original composition of mine called Joseph's Prayer with Producer Stephan Oberhoff, who is currently co-producing with Quincy Jones. It is the most complex song I have written and he ‘got it’ right away. It was magical." To accompany the album, a video was shot in the iconic Stats Home Decoration Center, which is dubbed "The Disneyland of Christmas stores," and Schaefer will present a mini-concert and CD signing at the store, which is just a few blocks from the PFCU branch. “I try to keep the two worlds separate, but many of the people in the community responding to the music project also know me as a face of the credit union, so I try to represent both well,” he said. From Here to Nativity is Johnny's second album. Both are available through his website, www.hearjohnny.com, and by Googling "Johnny Schaefer, From Here to Nativity" and then either iTunes, Amazon, Google Play Music, Spotify or just about any other online music retailer or streaming service. Video for All the Babes on Christmas Born can be found here Video for Ave Maria (Bach-Gounod) can be found here And video for People Look East can be found here

Pasadena Now

Johnny Schaefer records On December 10, at 4 p.m., the iconic Stats Home Decorative Center in Old Pasadena at 120 S. Raymond, will debut a Christmas album from Los Angeles-based singer-songwriter Johnny Schaefer. The popular store, often called “The Disneyland of Christmas stores,” is featuring a music video Johnny shot entirely in the store for his song People Look East on its website, www.statsfloral.com. The album, From Here to Nativity, carefully blends seven traditional songs and seven original tunes into a seamless experience that explores many of the moods and themes of the holiday season. There are contemplative ballads, folksy tunes, jazz, pop, and even a 50s rock-and-roll song about a kid who thinks he got stiffed by Santa Claus. “It was the happiest project of my life” Schaefer said, joyfully. The result is a musical journey that begins in the season of advent and proceeds through Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, and on to Epiphany, which completes the 12 Days of Christmas. There are contemplative ballads, folksy tunes, jazz, pop, and even a 50s rock-and-roll song about a kid who thinks he got stiffed by Santa Claus. “It was the happiest project of my life” Schaefer said, joyfully. Schaefer’s lifetime of singing in churches (his first solo in church was when he was four years old and he has been a cantor at Blessed Sacrament Church in Hollywood, CA since 1981,) is evident in his selection of songs that predominantly focus on the spiritual aspect of the season, hence the name From Here to Nativity. “I really wanted the album to be fresh,” Schaefer added. For example, Schaefer didn’t plan on singing O, Holy Night because it has been done so beautifully so many times by others. But after much encouragement. Schaefer teamed with Grammy-nominated harpist Carol Robbins to produce a jazzy waltz version of this classic. Original songs on the album include Joseph’s Prayer. “There were many songs about Mary, but few about Joseph, so I put myself in his shoes,” Schaefer said. To produce the son, Schaefer worked with Pasadena’s Stephan Oberhoff, who currently is co-producing with Grammy award-winner Quincy Jones and has been music director for Melissa Manchester and Brenda Russell for many years. During the recording, Oberhoff said he “looked forward to taking the song to where the creator wants it to be.” On the opposite end of the spectrum, Schaefer wanted a confection on the album that hinted at the novelty songs that become so popular at the holidays. He wrote a 50s-style doo-wop song called Oh Golly, Lookie and enlisted three singer/actress friends to form a backup trio similar to the famous chorus in Little Shop of Horrors. For one of the two Epiphany songs on the album, Schaefer drew on a tradition in his Hispanic neighborhood of Mt. Washington to create the Carlos Santana-influenced The Baby in the Cake. The song tells the story of the Rosca de Reyes, or Kings Cake consumed on Epiphany (January 6). A plastic baby Jesus is baked into a large round fruitcake symbolizing a crown and the fruit pieces are the gems. The person who gets the baby “wins” and is to throw a party on February 2 with lots of tamales. From Here to Nativity is available on www.hearjohnny.com and Spotify, Amazon, iTunes, Google Play, YouTube. Johnny Schaefer has a BA in Music Voice and Composition from California State University, Fullerton. He has been a cantor and soloist at Blessed Sacrament Church in Hollywood, Calif. since 1981. He has sung backup for Josh Groban, Melissa Manchester, Diahann Carroll, and Sarah Vaughan. He has performed with author/lecturer Marianne Williamson and is an Orange County Musical Arts Society Award Winner, as well as a winner in a Melissa Manchester cover contest.

Facebook post

I am America's NUMBER ONE HUMBUG... BUT, I have Johnny's Christmas Album and I play it daily. Brilliant voice artist, the best in music production and it will melt into you and "humbug" becomes the inoperative term. Gary Austin, founder of The Groundlings Theater in Los Angeles 

THe Hollywood Times.net

Johnny Schaefer in records on the soundstage atht eh USC School of Cinematic ArtsHOLIDAY MUSIC RELEASES December 7, 2016 ECLECTIC MIX OF GENRES HIGHLIGHT NEW CHRISTMAS ALBUM RELEASED BY LOS ANGELES ARTIST johnny-schaeferLos Angeles, CA. November 28, 2016 — As the contentious election of 2016 wore on and tensions increased, Los Angeles-based singer-songwriter Johnny Schaefer decided it was time to immerse himself in the joys of creating by combining two of his greatest loves: music and Christmas. The result is a musical journey that begins in the season of advent and proceeds through Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, and on to Epiphany, which completes the 12 Days of Christmas.

In From Here to Nativity, Schaefer carefully blends seven traditional songs and seven original tunes into a seamless experience that explores many of the moods and themes of the holiday season. There are contemplative ballads, folksy tunes, jazz, pop, and even a 50s rock-and-roll song about a kid who thinks he got stiffed by Santa Claus. “It was the happiest project of my life” Schaefer said, joyfully.

Schaefer’s lifetime of singing in churches (his first solo in church was when he was four years old and he has been a cantor at Blessed Sacrament Church in Hollywood, CA since 1981,) is evident in his selection of songs that predominantly focus on the spiritual aspect of the season, hence the name From Here to Nativity.

“I really wanted the album to be fresh,” Schaefer added.. For example, Schaefer didn’t plan on singing O, Holy Night because it has been done so beautifully so many times by others. But after much encouragement. Schaefer teamed with Grammy-nominated harpist Carol Robbins to produce a jazzy waltz version of this classic.

Original songs on the album include Joseph’s Prayer. “There were many songs about Mary, but not much about Joseph, so I put myself in his shoes,” Schaefer said. He worked with Stephan Oberhoff, who currently is co-producing with Grammy award-winner Quincy Jones and has been music director for Melissa Manchester and Brenda Russell for many years.. During the recording, Oberhoff said he “looked forward to taking the song to where the creator wants it to be.”

On the opposite end of the spectrum, Schaefer wanted a confection on the album that hinted at the novelty songs that become so popular at the holidays. He wrote a 50s-style doo-wop song called Oh Golly, Lookie and enlisted three singer/actress friends to form a backup trio similar to the famous chorus in Little Shop of Horrors.

For one of the two Epiphany songs on the album, Schaefer drew on a tradition in his Hispanic neighborhood of Mt. Washington to create the Carlos Santana-influenced The Baby in the Cake. The song tells the story of the Rosca de Reyes, or Kings Cake consumed on Epiphany (January 6). A plastic baby Jesus is baked into a large round fruitcake symbolizing a crown and the fruit pieces are the gems. The person who gets the baby “wins” and is to throw a party on February 2 with lots of tamales.

Schaefer also began writing with others for the first time, including film composer Lynn Kowal on Shepherd’s Light, a lyrical song that is destined to become a classic. Other songs on this album include a mash up of The Friendly Beasts, and Away in a Manger, also O Come, O Come, Emmanuel, which features Schaefer’s niece, Ellie Schaefer, a college freshman with a gorgeous alto voice.

From Here to Nativity is available on www.hearjohnny.com. Or search for the album title followed by Spotify, Amazon, iTunes, Google Play, YouTube.

Johnny Schaefer has a BA in Music Voice and Composition from California State University, Fullerton. He has been a cantor and soloist at Blessed Sacrament Church in Hollywood, CA since 1981. He has sung backup for Josh Groban, Melissa Manchester, Diahann Carroll, and Sarah Vaughan. He has performed with author and lecturer Marianne Williamson and is an Orange County Musical Arts Society Award Winner, as well as a winner in a Melissa Manchester cover contest. A mini- Christmas Concert 4:00 pm will be held on Saturday, followed by a CD Signing until 6:00 pm on December 10 at STATS 120 S. Raymond Ave. Pasadena, CA 91105.